New Zealand Emerges From Recession


New Zealand emerged from its worst recession in three decades, unexpectedly expanding for the first time in six quarters on rising consumer spending and exports of logs and dairy products.

Gross domestic product increased 0.1 percent in the three months to June 30 following a 0.8 percent drop in the first quarter, Statistics New Zealand said.

New Zealand’s dollar rose to a 13-month high as traders increased bets that Reserve Bank Governor Alan Bollard may raise interest rates sooner than he indicated earlier this month. Bollard, who expected a second-quarter contraction, said on Sept. 10 the benchmark interest rate needed to stay at a record-low 2.5 percent until late next year.

As sales slumped, companies shut plants and fired workers, pushing up the jobless rate to a nine-year high of 6 percent in the three months ended June 30.

Record-low interest rates, government spending and fewer New Zealanders heading overseas for higher-paid jobs has helped revive the housing market and consumer confidence.

Second-quarter house prices rose for the first time in six quarters and have continued to gain, according to the government. Consumer confidence rose to an 18 month high in June, according to a Westpac Banking Corp./McDermott Miller Ltd. poll.

Household spending, which makes up 60 percent of the economy, rose 0.4 percent in the second quarter, the first gain in six quarters, today’s report showed.

Sales of food and other so-called non-durable goods gained 0.8 percent and spending on services increased, led by medical and health. Purchases of durable items such as cars, furniture and home appliances declined.

Exports of goods and services increased 4.7 percent in the second quarter amid higher shipments of dairy products and lumber. Tourist spending in New Zealand declined. Import volumes slumped 3.8 percent.

Business investment increased 1.3 percent as companies spent more on software and on oil gas exploration, the statistics agency said. Plant and machinery investment fell.

Inventories declined by a record amount as demand for exports was met through existing stock rather than production, the agency said.


TradingEconomics.com, Bloomberg
9/23/2009 10:09:21 AM