The economy of Zimbabwe is estimated to have contracted by 4.1% year-on-year in 2020, due to the adverse effects of the 2019/20 drought and Covid19 restrictions. source: ZIMSTAT, Zimbabwe

GDP Annual Growth Rate in Zimbabwe averaged 2.60 percent from 1961 until 2020, reaching an all time high of 22.57 percent in 1970 and a record low of -17.20 percent in 2003. This page provides - Zimbabwe GDP Annual Growth Rate - actual values, historical data, forecast, chart, statistics, economic calendar and news. Zimbabwe GDP Annual Growth Rate - values, historical data and charts - was last updated on October of 2021.

GDP Annual Growth Rate in Zimbabwe is expected to reach 4.20 percent by the end of 2021, according to Trading Economics global macro models and analysts expectations. In the long-term, the Zimbabwe GDP Annual Growth Rate is projected to trend around 6.00 percent in 2022 and 7.00 percent in 2023, according to our econometric models.

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Zimbabwe GDP Annual Growth Rate


Zimbabwe Last Unit Reference Previous Highest Lowest
GDP Annual Growth Rate -4.10 percent Dec/20 -6.50 22.57 -17.20


Zimbabwe GDP Annual Growth Rate
Zimbabwe’s economy, once one of the strongest in Africa, has one of the lowest GDP per capita in the world. Years of mismanagement and endemic corruption has completely destroyed the country. The main sources of government revenues are exports of nickel, platinum, diamond and tobacco. To make things even worst, in response to political violence and human rights abuse, Zimbabwe has been subjected to numerous sanctions. As a result, the country experienced ten consecutive years of contraction and had one of the worst cases of hyperinflation of all time which resulted in the suspension of the national currency. The current sluggish growth is expected to endure as government fails to address structural obstacles to growth such as limited capital resource and deficient infrastructure.