Job advertisements in Australia declined by 2.8 percent month-over-month to a six-month low at 189,272 in September 2021, after a revised 2.7 percent fall a month earlier. This was the third straight month of drop in job ads, as COVID-19 related lockdowns cooled demand for labor. However, ANZ senior economist Catherine Birch said underlying labor demand was still robust, despite lockdowns. "Nationally, the proportion of businesses reporting vacancies was still almost double what it was pre-pandemic," she added. "As New South Wales and Victoria progressively reopen through Q4, we expect ANZ job ads, employment and hours worked to rebound and underemployment to drop." On an annual basis, job ads surged 61 percent. source: Australia and New Zealand Banking Group

Job Advertisements in Australia averaged 143106.55 from 1999 until 2021, reaching an all time high of 255917 in April of 2008 and a record low of 55440 in May of 2020. This page provides the latest reported value for - Australia Job Advertisements - plus previous releases, historical high and low, short-term forecast and long-term prediction, economic calendar, survey consensus and news. Australia Job Advertisements - data, historical chart, forecasts and calendar of releases - was last updated on October of 2021.

Job Advertisements in Australia is expected to be 183000.00 by the end of this quarter, according to Trading Economics global macro models and analysts expectations. In the long-term, the Australia Job Advertisements is projected to trend around 175000.00 in 2022, according to our econometric models.

Ok
Trading Economics members can view, download and compare data from nearly 200 countries, including more than 20 million economic indicators, exchange rates, government bond yields, stock indexes and commodity prices.

The Trading Economics Application Programming Interface (API) provides direct access to our data. It allows API clients to download millions of rows of historical data, to query our real-time economic calendar, subscribe to updates and receive quotes for currencies, commodities, stocks and bonds.

Please Paste this Code in your Website
width
height
Australia Job Advertisements


Calendar GMT Actual Previous Consensus TEForecast
2021-07-05 01:30 AM Jun 3% 6.8% 1.1%
2021-08-02 01:30 AM Jul -0.5% 1.5% -1.5%
2021-09-06 01:30 AM Aug -2.5% -1.3% -0.3%
2021-10-05 12:30 AM Sep -2.8% -2.7% 0.7%
2021-11-01 12:30 AM Oct -2.8%
2021-12-06 12:30 AM Nov


News Stream
Australia Job Ads Fall for 3rd Month
Job advertisements in Australia declined by 2.8 percent month-over-month to a six-month low at 189,272 in September 2021, after a revised 2.7 percent fall a month earlier. This was the third straight month of drop in job ads, as COVID-19 related lockdowns cooled demand for labor. However, ANZ senior economist Catherine Birch said underlying labor demand was still robust, despite lockdowns. "Nationally, the proportion of businesses reporting vacancies was still almost double what it was pre-pandemic," she added. "As New South Wales and Victoria progressively reopen through Q4, we expect ANZ job ads, employment and hours worked to rebound and underemployment to drop." On an annual basis, job ads surged 61 percent.
2021-10-05
Australia Job Ads Fewest in 4 Months
Job advertisements in Australia declined by 2.5 percent month-over-month to a four-month low at 195,995 in August 2021, after a revised 1.3 percent fall a month earlier. This was the second straight month of drop in job ads, as COVID-19 related lockdowns cooled demand for labor. However, ANZ senior economist Catherine Birch said the decline in job ads over two months has been minuscule compared to the 64 percent plunge during last year's national shutdown. "It is likely that ANZ job ads will decline further over coming months and we expect sizeable employment losses in locked-down areas, with the national unemployment rate to lift back above five percent," she said. "But given the momentum going into lockdowns, policy support and signs that activity should rebound once restrictions ease, we think the setback will be temporary." On an annual basis, job ads surged 78.9 percent.
2021-09-06
Australia Job Ads Fall for 1st Time in 14 Months
Job advertisements in Australia declined by 0.5 percent month-over-month to 206,819 in July 2021, after a downwardly revised 1.5 percent gain a month earlier to the highest since 2008. This was the first drop in job ads in 14 months, as COVID-19 related lockdowns cooled demand for labor. "This reinforces our expectation that the impact of New South Wales’s extended lockdown on employment and the unemployment rate will be limited; hours worked and underemployment will again bear the brunt," said ANZ senior economist Catherine Birch. "Many businesses are 'hoarding' labor to avoid the costs and delays of rehiring once restrictions ease, particularly given reported difficulty finding labor and the record-high job vacancy rate," she added. On an annual basis, job ads surged 94 percent.
2021-08-02
Australia Job Ads Rise for 13th Month
Job advertisements in Australia rose by 3.0 percent month-over-month to 211,854 in June 2021, after a downwardly revised 6.8 percent gain a month earlier. This was the 13th straight month of gains in job ads, as dmand for labor remained strong despite the latest COVID-19 lockdown across the country. "Recent history shows that workers laid off or stood down during lockdowns tend to be reinstated or find new jobs quickly once restrictions lift, given the underlying strength in the labor market and overall demand," said ANZ senior economist, Catherine Birch. "Vacancies are twice their pre-pandemic level, and there are now 1.9 unemployed people per vacancy, easily the lowest ration on record," Birch added. On an annual bases, job ads surged almost 129 percent.
2021-07-05

Australia Last Unit Reference Previous Highest Lowest
Job Advertisements 189271.82 Sep/21 194686.11 255917.00 55440.00


Australia Job Advertisements
In Australia, job advertisements measure the number of jobs advertised in the major daily newspapers and internet sites covering the capital cities.