Australia's import prices rose by 5.1 percent quarter-on-quarter in Q1 of 2022, after a 5.8 percent gain in Q4 which was the steepest pace since Q4 2008. The latest figure represented the fifth straight quarter of growth in import prices, amid a further recovery in the economy from the COVID-19 crisis and soaring energy prices. Main contributors to the rise were: petroleum, petroleum products and related materials (20.4%), driven by strong global oil demand and supply constraints; fertilizers (excluding crude) (19%), due to rising energy costs of production and strong global demand, particularly for urea; electrical machinery apparatus (4.5%), led by rising production costs; articles of apparel and clothing (4.7%), linked to higher material costs and costs of manufacturing; and coffee, tea and cocoa (20.1%), driven by higher costs of production, including fertilizers costs. Through the year to Q1, import prices went up 19.3%, the most since Q4 2008, after a 13.8% gain in Q4. source: Australian Bureau of Statistics

Import Prices in Australia averaged 94.58 points from 1981 until 2022, reaching an all time high of 126.60 points in the first quarter of 2022 and a record low of 51.50 points in the third quarter of 1981. This page provides the latest reported value for - Australia Import Prices - plus previous releases, historical high and low, short-term forecast and long-term prediction, economic calendar, survey consensus and news. Australia Import Prices - data, historical chart, forecasts and calendar of releases - was last updated on May of 2022.

Import Prices in Australia is expected to be 120.50 points by the end of this quarter, according to Trading Economics global macro models and analysts expectations. In the long-term, the Australia Import Prices is projected to trend around 111.00 points in 2023, according to our econometric models.

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Australia Import Prices



Calendar GMT Actual Previous Consensus TEForecast
2022-01-27 12:30 AM Q4 5.8% 5.4% 6%
2022-04-28 01:30 AM Q1 5.1% 5.8% 6%


Related Last Previous Unit Reference
Inflation Rate 5.10 3.50 percent Mar 2022
Inflation Rate Mom 2.10 1.30 percent Mar 2022
Consumer Price Index CPI 123.90 121.30 points Mar 2022
Core Inflation Rate 3.70 2.60 percent Mar 2022
Core Consumer Prices 122.75 121.10 points Mar 2022
GDP Deflator 107.20 107.36 points Dec 2021
Producer Prices 118.30 116.40 points Mar 2022
Producer Prices Change 4.90 3.70 percent Mar 2022
Export Prices 178.00 150.90 points Mar 2022
Import Prices 126.60 120.50 points Mar 2022
Food Inflation 4.30 1.90 percent Mar 2022
CPI Transportation 121.50 116.60 points Mar 2022
CPI Housing Utilities 129.00 125.60 points Mar 2022

Australia Import Prices
In Australia, Import Prices correspond to the rate of change in the prices of goods and services purchased by residents of that country from, and supplied by, foreign sellers. Import Prices are heavily affected by exchange rates.
Actual Previous Highest Lowest Dates Unit Frequency
126.60 120.50 126.60 51.50 1981 - 2022 points Quarterly
2011-2012=100, NSA

News Stream
Australia Q1 Import Prices Remain Elevated
Australia's import prices rose by 5.1 percent quarter-on-quarter in Q1 of 2022, after a 5.8 percent gain in Q4 which was the steepest pace since Q4 2008. The latest figure represented the fifth straight quarter of growth in import prices, amid a further recovery in the economy from the COVID-19 crisis and soaring energy prices. Main contributors to the rise were: petroleum, petroleum products and related materials (20.4%), driven by strong global oil demand and supply constraints; fertilizers (excluding crude) (19%), due to rising energy costs of production and strong global demand, particularly for urea; electrical machinery apparatus (4.5%), led by rising production costs; articles of apparel and clothing (4.7%), linked to higher material costs and costs of manufacturing; and coffee, tea and cocoa (20.1%), driven by higher costs of production, including fertilizers costs. Through the year to Q1, import prices went up 19.3%, the most since Q4 2008, after a 13.8% gain in Q4.
2022-04-28
Australia Q4 Import Prices Rise the Most in 13 Years
Australia's import prices rose by 5.8 percent quarter-on-quarter in Q4 2021, after a 5.4 percent gain in Q3. This was the fourth straight quarter of growth in import prices and the steepest pace since Q4 2008, amid a faster recovery in the economy from the COVID-19 and soaring energy prices. Main contributors to the rise were: petroleum, petroleum products (14.6%), driven by strong global oil demand outpacing growth in global supply; road vehicles (4.3%), led by the introduction of new model vehicles; inorganic chemicals (51.2%), lifted by sodium hydroxide demand, primarily used in bauxite refining; telecommunications equipment (6%), due to primarily by new mobile phone model releases entering the market at higher prices; fertilizers (19%), amid rising energy costs of production and strong global demand, particularly for urea. Through the year to Q4, import prices went up 13.8%, the most since Q1 2009, accelerating sharply from a 6.4% gain in Q3.
2022-01-27
Australia Q3 Import Prices Rise the Most in 8 Years
Australia's import prices rose by 5.4 percent quarter-on-quarter in Q3 2021, accelerating sharply from a 1.9 percent gain in Q2. This was the third straight quarter of growth in import prices and the steepest pace since Q3 2013, amid a faster recovery in the economy from the COVID-19 and soaring energy prices. Main contributors to the rise were: petroleum, petroleum products (12.2%), driven by price rises in refined products, stronger oil demand and constrained global supply; fertilizers (42.6%); road vehicles (including air-cushion vehicles) (2.7%), on input component shortages affecting global supply; iron and steel (18.7%), due to the global construction boom, logistic constraints and supply shortages; and textile yarn, fabrics, made-up articles (13.6%), due to increased input costs, particularly cotton. The main offsetting contributor was: telecommunications and sound recording equipment (-2.%), due to the discounting of older model mobile phones.
2021-10-28