Wednesday August 16 2017
Netherlands GDP Growth at Near 10-Year High in Q2
Statistics Netherlands | Joana Taborda | joana.taborda@tradingeconomics.com

The Dutch economy advanced 1.5 percent on quarter in the second quarter of 2017, following an upwardly revised 0.6 percent rise in the previous period and beating market expectations of 0.6 percent. It is the strongest growth rate since the last three months of 2007, mainly boosted by higher household spending and exports, preliminary estimates showed.

Household spending went up at a faster 0.9 percent (0.2 percent in the previous period) and government consumption rebounded (0.7 percent compared to -0.1 percent in the previous period) while gross fixed capital formation slowed (0.8 percent compared to 4.5 percent). Exports jumped 1.8 percent (1.6 percent in the previous period) and imports went up 1.2 percent (2 percent in the previous period). 

Year-on-year, the economy expanded 3.3 percent in the second quarter of the year, above 3.2 percent in the previous period and beating forecasts of 2.3 percent. It is also the highest expansion since the last quarter of 2007. Household spending rose faster (2.5 percent compared to 1.7 percent in the previous period), mainly due to spending on clothing, electrical appliances, home design, food, beverages and tobacco and catering services. On the other hand, slower growth rates were recorded for government consumption (1 percent compared to 1.1 percent) and investment (4.1 percent compared to 6.6 percent). Exports went up 4.5 percent (5.5 percent in the previous period), mainly boosted by sales of chemicals, machinery and equipment. Imports rose at a slower 3.7 percent (5.3 percent in the previous period).




Friday June 23 2017
Dutch Q1 GDP Growth Confirmed At 0.4%
Statistics Netherlands | Joana Ferreira | joana.ferreira@tradingeconomics.com

The Dutch economy advanced 0.4 percent on quarter in the first three months of 2017, following a 0.6 percent expansion in the previous period and matching the preliminary estimate. It was the weakest growth rate since the last quarter of 2015 as household consumption rose at a slower pace and government spending contracted while fixed investment rebounded sharply.

The economy posted its twelfth consecutive quarter of growth, despite being the weakest in over a year. Household consumption rose at a slower pace (0.1 percent from 0.5 percent in Q4 2016) while fixed investment rebounded (4.6 percent from -1.7 percent in Q4). Also, changes in inventories added 0.2 percentage points to growth (0.3 p.p. in Q4). By contrast, government spending contracted 0.3 percent, after increasing by 0.4 percent in Q4, and net external demand contributed negatively, as imports jumped 2 percent (0.6 percent in Q4) while exports went up at a slower 1.4 percent (1.1 percent in Q4).

Year-on-year, the gross domestic product grew 3.2 percent, slower than a flash estimate of 3.4 percent and following a downwardly revised 2.4 percent expansion in the previous period. It was the highest annual growth rate since the first quarter of 2008, mainly boosted by a 8.3 percent jump in business investment (-1.5 percent in Q4), namely in software, machinery and telecommunication equipment. Meanwhile, private consumption rose at a slower 1.7 percent (2.3 percent in Q4) and government spending went up 1.1 percent (1.6 percent in Q4). Also, net external demand contributed positively, as exports rose 5.5 percent (2.6 percent in Q4) while imports increased at a slower 5.3 percent (0.9 percent in Q4). By contrast, government investment shrank 1.9 percent (1.2 percent in Q4).


Tuesday May 16 2017
Dutch GDP Growth Lower Than Expected In Q1
Statistics Netherlands | Joana Taborda | joana.taborda@tradingeconomics.com

The Dutch economy advanced 0.4 percent on quarter in the first three months of 2017, lower than 0.6 percent in the previous period and below market expectations of 0.5 percent. It is the lowest growth rate since the last quarter of 2015 as household spending and inventories went down while business investment rebounded and rose the most in six years, preliminary estimates showed.

Consumer spending fell 0.1 percent (0.6 percent in Q4); public consumption slowed (0.2 percent vs 0.6 percent) and inventories dropped 0.2 percent (vs 0.1 percent). In addition, exports rose 0.9 percent, the same as in Q4 while imports rose faster (1.2 percent vs 0.5 percent). In contrast, gross fixed investment recovered (5.1 percent vs -1.6 percent). 

Year-on-year, the GDP expanded 3.4 percent, above 2.5 percent in the last three months of 2016 and beating expectations of 2.8 percent. It is the highest annual growth rate since the last quarter of 2007, mainly boosted by a 7.6 percent jump in business investment (1.3 percent in Q4), namely in software, machinery and telecommunication equipment. Public investment also rose faster (2.1 percent vs 0.6 percent in Q4); government spending increased 1.6 percent (1.5 percent in Q4) while private consumption slowed (1.6 percent vs 2.6 percent in Q4). Exports grew 4.7 percent (2.5 percent in Q4), namely chemicals, machinery, base metal products and transport. Imports went up at a slower 4.1 percent (1.3 percent in Q4).

The first quarter of 2017 had two more working days than the same quarter in 2016. Accounting for those calendar effects, the economy advanced 2.8 percent. The European Commission expects the Dutch GDP to grow 2.1 percent in 2017.


Friday March 24 2017
Dutch GDP Growth Revised Up Slightly To 0.6% In Q4
Rida | rida@tradingeconomics.com

The Dutch economy expanded 0.6 percent on quarter in the December quarter of 2016, faster than preliminary estimates of a 0.5 percent growth but slower than a 0.8 percent expansion in the third quarter, final figures showed. It was the 11th straight quarter of growth, as a rebound in government spending and positive contribution from net trade offset a slowdown in private consumption and a decline in investment.

In the fourth quarter, private consumption increased by 0.7 percent, slowing from a 1.0 percent rise in the prior quarter. Government spending rebounded 0.6 percent, after declining 0.1 percent in the September quarter. Net trade contributed positively to the GDP growth. Exports grew by 0.9 percent (from 1.0 percent) and imports went up 0.4 percent (from 0.9 percent). In contrast, gross fixed capital formation contracted by 2.5 percent (after remaining unchanged in Q3). Changes in inventories added  0.2 percentage points to the GDP growth. 

Year-on-year, gross domestic product advanced 2.5 percent, faster than preliminary estimates of  2.3 percent growth but the same pace as an upwardly revised figure in the prior quarter. Private consumption rose 2.6 percent (from 1.9 percent in Q3). Government spending also increased by 1.5 percent (from 0.7 percent). Exports of good and services went up 2.5 percent (from 2.8 percent). Imports rose 1.3 percent, slowing from a 3.1 percent rise in Q3. In contrast, gross fixed capital formation contracted by 1.0 percent (after a 7.2 percent rise in the preceding quarter). 

Considering full 2016, the economy grew by 2.2 percent, faster than a 2.0 percent expansion in 2015, mainly driven by private consumption and fixed investment.


Tuesday February 14 2017
Dutch Q4 GDP Growth Eases To 0.5% QoQ
CBS | Joana Ferreira | joana.ferreira@tradingeconomics.com

The Dutch economy advanced 0.5 percent on quarter in the last three months of 2016, easing from a 0.8 percent expansion in the previous period and slightly below market expectations of a 0.6 percent growth, the preliminary estimate showed. Government spending rebounded and exports grew further, while household consumption expanded at a slower pace and fixed investment contracted.

The economy posted its eleventh consecutive quarter of growth, as government spending rebounded 0.6 percent (-0.3 percent in Q3). Also, net trade contributed positively as exports advanced 1.4 percent (from 1.1 percent in Q3) and imports rose at a slower 1 percent (the same as in Q3). Changes in inventories added also 0.1 percentage point to growth. Meanwhile, household consumption growth eased to 0.7 percent (from 1 percent in Q3) and gross fixed capital formation contracted sharply by 2.9 percent (-0.2 percent in Q3).

Year-on-year, gross domestic product rose 2.3 percent after a 2.4 percent increase in the third quarter, due to a 1.6 percent contraction in fixed investment (from 7.2 percent in Q3), while household consumption expanded 2.6 percent (from 2 percent in Q3) and government spending advanced 1.2 percent (from 0.2 percent in Q3). Net external demand continued to contribute positively as exports went up 3.2 percent (from 2.7 percent in Q3 while imports rose at a slower 2 percent (from 2.9 percent in Q3). 

Considering the full year of 2016, the economy grew by 2.1 percent, slightly higher than a 2 percent expansion in 2015. Fixed investment and household consumption contributed the most to the growth.


Friday December 23 2016
Dutch GDP Growth Revised Up to 0.8% in Q3
Statistics Netherlands l Rida Husna | rida@tradingeconomics.com

The Dutch economy expanded 0.8 percent on quarter in the third quarter of 2016, slightly faster than a 0.7 percent growth in a preliminary figure as well as in the previous two quarters, final figure showed.

In the September quarter, the economy posted its eleventh straight quarter of growth and the strongest since the fourth quarter 2014. Household consumption grew by 0.9 percent (from +0.3 percent in Q2) while net trade contributed positively (exports rose 1 percent, compared to +0.2 percent in Q2 and imports also went up 1 percent, following + 0.1 percent in Q2). Meanwhile,  gross fixed capital formation grew 0.6 percent ( from +1.9 percent in Q2). In contrast, government spending contracted 0.4 percent (from +0.6 percent in Q2).

Year-on-year the economy advanced 2.4 percent, following a 2.3 percent expansion in the previous period. It was the fastest growth since the March quarter 2015. Growth was mainly driven by private consumption (+2.0 percent from +1.1 percent in the preceding quarter) and business investment (+9.2 percent from +9.3 percent). An increase was also seen in government consumption (+0.2 percent from +1.2 percent) and exports (+2.7 percent from +4.0 percent). In contrast, a decline was seen in government investment (-0.7 percent from -3.0 percent).


Tuesday November 15 2016
Dutch GDP Beats Expectations in Q3
Statistics Netherlands | Yekaterina Guchshina | yekaterina@tradingeconomics.com

The Dutch economy advanced 0.7 percent on quarter in the third quarter of 2016, at the same pace as in the previous period and above market expectations of 0.4 percent, flash estimates showed.

The economy posted its tenth consecutive quarter of growth, as household consumption expanded 0.7 percent (+0.3 percent in Q2). Also, net trade contributed positively as exports accelerated (1.2 percent compared to 0.2 percent in Q2) at a faster pace than imports (1.1 percent compared to 0.1 percent in Q2). In contrast, gross fixed capital formation grew at a slower 0.5 percent (+1.9 percent in Q2) and government spending contracted 0.1 percent (+0.6 percent in Q2). 

Year-on-year, the economy advanced Dutch economy advanced 2.4 percent, following 2.3 percent growth in the previous period. While private consumption expanded at a faster pace (+1.7 percent from +1.1 percent in Q2); business investment (+6.9 percent from +7 percent in Q2) and government spending (+0.9 percent from +0.4 percent in Q2) slowed slightly. Exports rose 3 percent (+4 percent in Q2) and imports increased 3.1 percent (+4.2 percent in Q2). 


Friday August 12 2016
Dutch GDP Expands 0.6% in Q2
Yekaterina Guchshina | yekaterina@tradingeconomics.com

The Dutch economy advanced 0.6 percent on quarter in the second quarter of 2016, following to an upwardly revised 0.6 percent expansion in the previous period and above market expectations of 0.5 percent, flash estimates showed.

The economy posted its ninth consecutive quarter of growth, as gross fixed capital formation expanded by 2.5 percent (+1.3 percent in Q1), government spending rose by 0.5 percent (+0.7 percent in Q1) and household consumption went up 0.2 percent (+0.5 percent in Q1). Meantime, exports of goods and services showed no growth (+1.0 percent in Q1) while imports contracted 0.2 percent (+0.6 percent).

Year-on-year, the economy advanced Dutch economy advanced 2.3 percent, following 1.5 percent growth in the previous period and well above market expectations of 1.2 percent. While government spending (+0.9 percent from +0.4 percent in Q1) expanded at a faster pace and government investment rebounded (+4.6 percent from -3.1 percent in Q1), private consumption (+1.2 percent from +1.3 percent in Q1) and business investment (+8.3 percent from +10.0 percent in Q1) slowed. Exports rose 4.0 percent (+4.8 percent in Q1) and imports increased 4.2 percent (+6.6 percent in Q1). 


Friday May 13 2016
Netherlands GDP Growth Up to 0.5%
CBS | Joana Taborda | joana.taborda@tradingeconomics.com

The Dutch economy expanded 0.5 percent on quarter in the first three months of 2016, accelerating from a 0.3 percent growth in the previous quarter and matching market expectations, preliminary figures showed. It is the eighth consecutive quarter of growth and the highest performance in a year as consumption, investment and exports made positive contributions.

Year-on-year, the GDP advanced 1.4 percent, slowing from a 1.6 percent growth in the previous quarter but higher than market expectations of 1.1 percent. Private spending grew at a faster 2 percent (1.8 percent in Q4 2015), mainly due to spending on services such as catering, recreation and culture. Expenditure on services make up half of the total domestic consumer spending. Government spending went up 2.2 percent, rebounding from a 0.1 percent fall in the previous quarter while public investment grew at a slightly slower 1.2 percent (1.3 percent in Q4 2015).  Business investment remained resilient but grew at a lower 9.3 percent (11.9 percent in the previous quartet). Companies have invested more in vehicles including trucks, trailers, aircrafts, cars, homes, computers and software. In addition, exports (1.8 percent from 3.1 percent) and imports (3.4 percent from 5.1 percent) growth slowed. Companies sold more means of transport while shipments of gas, machinery and equipment shrank. As a result, net trade made a negative contribution to growth. 


Friday March 25 2016
Dutch GDP Growth Confirmed at 0.3% QoQ in Q4
Yekaterina Guchshina | yekaterina@tradingeconomics.com

The Dutch economy advanced 0.3 percent on quarter in the three months to December of 2015, compared to an upwardly revised 0.2 percent expansion in the previous period, final estimates showed. It was the seventh consecutive quarter of growth, mainly driven by investments.

The economy posted its seventh consecutive quarter of growth, as gross fixed capital formation expanded by 3.1 percent (+0.8 percent in Q3). By contrast, government spending contracted by 0.4 percent (+0.4 percent in Q3) and household consumption showed no growth (0.0 percent in Q3). Net external demand continued to weigh on growth, as exports of goods and services grew 1.7 percent (+0.7 percent) while imports rose at a faster 2.2 percent (+1.3 percent in Q3)

Year-on-year, the economy advanced by 1.6 percent, down from an upwardly revised 2.0 percent in the previous quarter. It was the lowest growth rate since the fourth quarter of 2014. An expansion was seen for: investments (+9.6 percent from +10.2 percent in Q3), household (+1.2 percent from +1.8 percent) and government consumption (+0.3 percent from +0.6 percent). Net external demand continued to drag the growth down, as exports increased by 6.4 percent (+4.4 percent in Q3) while imports rose at a faster 8.6 percent (+5.8 percent in Q3).

Considering full 2015, GDP advanced 2.0 percent, accelerating from 1.0 percent in 2014, as investment increased by 10.3 percent (+3.5 percent in 2014) and household consumption expanded by 1.1 percent after showing no growth in the previous year.