Friday September 21 2018
Dutch GDP Growth Revised Higher to 0.8% in Q2
Statistics Netherlands | Chusnul Ch Manan | chusnul@tradingeconomics.com

The Dutch economy advanced by 0.8 percent on quarter in the three months to June 2018, above the preliminary estimate of 0.7 percent and following a 0.6 percent expansion in the previous period.

Net external demand was the main driver of growth, as exports jumped 1.3 percent in the second quarter (vs -0.5 percent in Q1) and imports increased at a slower 0.3 percent (vs 0.4 percent in Q1). Also, fixed investment advanced 1.1 percent (vs 2.6 percent in Q1) and household consumption grew 0.3 percent (vs 1.4 percent in Q1). Government spending rose 0.1 percent (vs 0.4 percent in Q1), while changes in inventories had no contribution to growth (vs 0.5 percentage points in Q1).
 
Year-on-year, the Dutch economy grew by 3.1 percent year-on-year in the second quarter, above the preliminary estimate of 2.9 percent and following a 2.8 percent expansion in the previous period. It was the strongest growth rate since the second quarter of 2008, mainly driven by exports (3.5 percent vs 2.5 percent in Q1). Also, increases were seen in fixed investment (5.9 percent vs 6.3 percent), household expenditure (2.6 percent vs 3.6 percent) and public spending increased (1.1 percent vs 1.3 percent). Additionally, inventory changes contributed 0.7 percentage points to the GDP growth (vs -1 percentage point in Q1).




Tuesday August 14 2018
Dutch Q2 GDP Growth Stronger than Expected
CBS | Joana Ferreira | joana.ferreira@tradingeconomics.com

The Dutch economy grew by 0.7 percent on quarter in the three months to June 2018, following a 0.6 percent expansion in the previous period and beating market expectations of 0.5 percent, a preliminary estimate showed. Growth was mainly driven by foreign trade and investments.

Net external demand was the main driver of growth, as exports jumped 0.9 percent in the second quarter (vs -0.6 percent in Q1) and imports dropped 0.1 percent (vs 0.3 percent in Q1). Also, fixed investment advanced 0.7 percent (vs 2.5 percent in Q1) and government spending rose 0.2 percent (vs 0.4 percent in Q1). Changes in inventories contributed 0.1 percentage points to growth (vs 0.6 percentage points in Q1). On the other hand, household consumption was unchanged in the second quarter after a 1.4 percent surge in the previous period.

Compared with the same quarter of 2017, the GDP rose by 2.9 percent in the three months to June, following a 2.8 percent advance in the previous period. Growth was driven by fixed investment (5.3 percent vs 6.3 percent in Q1), exports (2.9 percent vs 2.5 percent), household expenditure (2.2 percent vs 3.6 percent) and public spending (1.2 percent vs 1.3 percent). Also, changes in stocks contributed 0.8 percentage points to growth (vs -1 percentage points in Q1).


Friday June 22 2018
Dutch Q1 GDP Growth Revised Up to 0.6%
Statistics Netherlands l Chusnul Ch Manan | chusnul@tradingeconomics.com

The Dutch economy advanced by 0.6 percent on quarter in the three months to March of 2018, slowing from an upwardly revised 0.9 percent rise in the fourth quarter of 2017, beating market expectations of a 0.5 percent expansion, and above the preliminary estimates of 0.5 percent expansion.

Compared to the fourth quarter of 2017, output rose faster for household spending (1.5 percent from 0.2 percent in Q4) and fixed investment rebounded (2.7 percent from -1.1 percent). Meanwhile, government spending (0.4 percent vs 0.2 percent) and changes in inventories (0.7 percent from 0.5 percent in Q4) contributed little to the expansion. Meantime, net external trade contributed negatively to growth as exports declined 0.6 percent (1.1 percent in Q4) while imports went up 0.5 percent (0.9 percent in Q4).

Year-on-year, the Dutch economy grew by 2.8 percent in the first quarter of 2018, accelerating slightly from a downwardly revised 2.7 percent expansion in the previous period. Growth was primarily driven by fixed investment (6.3 percent from 5.9 percent in Q4) and household expenditure (3.6 percent vs 1.1 percent). Also, public spending advanced more (1.3 percent vs 0.9 percent). Meanwhile, net external trade contributed negatively to growth for the first time in more than two years, as imports increased 3.9 percent (5.5 percent in Q4) and exports went up at a slower 2.5 percent (6.2 percent in Q4).
 
 
 
 
 


Tuesday May 15 2018
Dutch Economy Grows at a Slower 0.5% in Q1
Statistics Netherlands l Luisa Carvalho | luisa.carvalho@tradingeconomics.com

The Dutch economy advanced by 0.5 percent on quarter in the three months to March of 2018, slowing from a downwardly revised 0.7 percent rise in the fourth quarter and below market expectations of a 0.6 percent growth. The expansion was mainly boosted by household consumption and fixed investment.

Compared to the fourth quarter of 2017, output rose faster for household spending (1.7 percent after showing no growth in Q4) and fixed investment (2.3 percent from 0.3 percent). Meanwhile, government spending (0.1 percent vs 0.3 percent) and changes in inventories (0.1 percent after no growth in Q4) contributed little to the expansion. Meantime, net external trade contributed negatively to growth as exports declined 0.1 percent (1.3 percent in Q4) while imports went up 0.9 percent (1.1 percent in Q4).

Year-on-year, the Dutch economy grew by 2.8 percent in the first quarter of 2018, easing slightly from a 2.9 percent expansion in the previous period. Growth was primarily driven by fixed investment (6.2 percent, the same pace as in Q4) and household expenditure (3.2 percent vs 1.0 percent) which rose the most in over 17 years. Also, public spending advanced more (1.4 percent vs 0.9 percent). Meanwhile, net external trade contributed negatively to growth for the first time in more than two years, as imports jumped 4.7 percent (6.3 percent in Q4) and exports increased at a slower 3.6 percent (7.0 percent in Q4).  


Monday March 26 2018
Dutch Q4 GDP Growth Confirmed at 0.8%
Statistics Netherlands l Chusnul Ch Manan | chusnul@tradingeconomics.com

The Dutch economy grew by 0.8 percent on quarter in the three months to December of 2017, following a 0.4 percent expansion in the previous period and matching the preliminary estimate.

Net external demand was the main driver of growth, as exports jumped 1.6 percent (vs 2 percent in Q3) and imports increased at a slower 1.1 percent (vs 2.1 percent in Q3). Also, government spending advanced 0.3 percent, the same pace as in the previous three-month period and changes in inventories had no contribution to GDP growth (vs -0.2 p.p. in Q3). On the other hand, there was a contraction in household consumption (-0.2 percent vs 0.4 percent in Q3) while fixed investment was unchanged (vs 2.1 percent in Q3).

Compared with the same quarter of 2016, the GDP rose by 2.9 percent, easing slightly from a 3 percent advance in the previous period. Growth was driven by fixed investment (6.2 percent vs 6.6 percent in Q3), exports (7 percent vs 6.5 percent), household expenditure (1 percent vs 2.5 percent) and public spending (0.9 percent vs 1.4 percent). Also, changes in stocks contributed 0.4 p.p. to growth (vs 0.2 p.p. in Q3).

Considering 2017 full year, the economy grew by 3.2 percent, compared with 2.2 percent in 2016. It was the strongest pace of expansion since 2007.


Wednesday February 14 2018
Dutch Q4 GDP Growth Stronger than Expected
CBS | Joana Ferreira | joana.ferreira@tradingeconomics.com

The Dutch economy grew by 0.8 percent on quarter in the three months to December of 2017, following a 0.4 percent expansion in the previous period and beating market expectations of 0.6 percent, the preliminary estimate showed.

Net external demand was the main driver of growth, as exports jumped 0.8 percent (vs 1.8 percent in Q3) and imports increased at a slower 0.1 percent (vs 1.8 percent in Q3). Also, government spending advanced 0.5 percent, after showing no growth in the previous three-month period and changes in inventories contributed 0.1 percentage points to growth (vs -0.2 p.p. in Q3). On the other hand, there was a contraction in household consumption (-0.3 percent vs 0.4 percent in Q3) while fixed investment was unchanged (vs 2.1 percent in Q3).

Compared with the same quarter of 2016, the GDP rose by 2.9 percent, easing slightly from a 3 percent advance in the previous period. Growth was driven by fixed investment (6.4 percent vs 7 percent in Q3), exports (5.5 percent vs 6.4 percent), household expenditure (0.9 percent vs 2.4 percent) and public spending (0.8 percent vs 1 percent). Also, changes in stocks contributed 0.5 p.p. to growth (vs 0.2 p.p. in Q3).

Considering 2017 full year, the economy grew by 3.1 percent, compared with 2.2 percent in 2016. It was the strongest pace of expansion since 2007.


Friday December 22 2017
Dutch Q3 GDP Growth Confirmed at 0.4%
Statistics Netherlands l Chusnul Ch Manan | chusnul@tradingeconomics.com

The Dutch economy advanced 0.4 percent on quarter in the third three months of 2017, following a 1.5 percent expansion in the previous period and matching the preliminary estimate. It was the weakest growth rate since the second quarter 2016, as exports and private consumption growth slowed. Meantime, investment rose faster and government spending stalled.

Household spending increased at a slower 0.6 percent (0.9 percent in the previous period) while government consumption stalled (0.7 percent in Q2). Export also rose less (1.9 percent compared to 2 percent) and imports increased more (2.1 percent compared to 1.4 percent).
 
Meantime, investment growth accelerated (2.4 percent compared to 1 percent), mainly due to a rebound in public investment (16.9 percent compared to -1.1 percent). Investment from companies and households fell (-0.4 percent compared to 1.4 percent).
 
Year-on-year, the economy advanced at a slower 3 percent (3.3 percent in the previous period). Public expenditure rose slightly less (1 percent compared to 1.1 percent) while household spending rose similar with as in Q2 (2.4 percent). Investment jumped 7 percent, following a 4.2 percent rise in the previous period as public one rebounded (18 percent compared to -8.1 percent) while private one rose slower (4.4 percent compared to 6.7 percent). Exports surged 6.4 percent (4.6 percent in Q2) and imports went up 6 percent (3.8 percent in Q2).
 
 
 


Tuesday November 14 2017
Dutch GDP Growth Slows to 0.4% in Q3
Joana Taborda | joana.taborda@tradingeconomics.com

The Dutch economy expanded 0.4 percent on quarter in the three months to September of 2017, well below a 1.5 percent growth in the previous period which was the highest in nearly 10 years. There were smaller positive contributions from household consumption, and net trade as exports rose less and imports grew more. In contrast, investment growth was strong.

Household consumption grew only 0.6 percent (0.9 percent in Q2) while government spending stalled (0.7 percent in Q2). Exports also rose less (1.7 percent comapred to 2 percent) and imports advanced more (1.7 percent compared to 1.3 percent).

On the other hand, investment growth accelerated (2 percent compared to 0.9 percent), mainly due to a rebound in public investment (4.8 percent compared to -3.6 percent). Investment from companies and households rose less (1.5 percent compared to 1.8 percent). 

Year-on-year, the economy advanced at a slower 3 percent (3.3 percent in the previous period). Public expenditure went up slightly less (1 percent compared to 1.1 percent) while household spending rose slightly more (2.5 percent compared to 2.4 percent), mainly due to electrical appliances, clothing and services such as catering and recreation. Investment jumped 6.2 percent, following a 4.2 percent rise in the previous period as private one rose faster (7.8 percent compared to 6.7 percent) and public one fell less (-0.7 percent compared to -8.1 percent). Exports jumped 6 percent (4.6 percent in Q2) and imports increased 5.4 percent (3.8 percent in Q2). 


Wednesday October 11 2017
Dutch Q2 GDP Growth Confirmed at 1.5%
Statistics Netherlands l Chusnul Ch Manan | chusnul@tradingeconomics.com

The Dutch economy advanced 1.5 percent on quarter in the second three months of 2017, following a 0.6 percent expansion in the previous period and matching the preliminary estimate. It was the strongest growth rate since the last quarter of 2007, mainly driven by higher household consumption and exports while government spending rebounded.

Household spending increased at a faster 0.8 percent (0.2 percent in the previous period) and government consumption rebounded (0.8 percent compared to -0.1 percent in the previous period) while gross fixed capital formation slowed (0.8 percent compared to 4.5 percent). Exports went up 1.8 percent (1.6 percent in the previous period) and imports rose 1.2 percent (2 percent in the previous period).
 
Year-on-year, the economy expanded 3.3 percent in the second quarter of the year, above 3.2 percent in the previous period. It was also the highest expansion since the last quarter of 2007. Household spending increased faster (2.4 percent compared to 1.7 percent in the previous period). On the other hand,  government consumption grew by 1.1 percent, the same pace as in the previous period, while investment went up slower (4.2 percent compared to 6.6 percent). Exports rose 4.6 percent (5.5 percent in the previous period. While  imports went up at a slower 3.8 percent (5.3 percent in the previous period).
 
 
 
 
 
 


Wednesday August 16 2017
Netherlands GDP Growth at Near 10-Year High in Q2
Statistics Netherlands | Joana Taborda | joana.taborda@tradingeconomics.com

The Dutch economy advanced 1.5 percent on quarter in the second quarter of 2017, following an upwardly revised 0.6 percent rise in the previous period and beating market expectations of 0.6 percent. It is the strongest growth rate since the last three months of 2007, mainly boosted by higher household spending and exports, preliminary estimates showed.

Household spending went up at a faster 0.9 percent (0.2 percent in the previous period) and government consumption rebounded (0.7 percent compared to -0.1 percent in the previous period) while gross fixed capital formation slowed (0.8 percent compared to 4.5 percent). Exports jumped 1.8 percent (1.6 percent in the previous period) and imports went up 1.2 percent (2 percent in the previous period). 

Year-on-year, the economy expanded 3.3 percent in the second quarter of the year, above 3.2 percent in the previous period and beating forecasts of 2.3 percent. It is also the highest expansion since the last quarter of 2007. Household spending rose faster (2.5 percent compared to 1.7 percent in the previous period), mainly due to spending on clothing, electrical appliances, home design, food, beverages and tobacco and catering services. On the other hand, slower growth rates were recorded for government consumption (1 percent compared to 1.1 percent) and investment (4.1 percent compared to 6.6 percent). Exports went up 4.5 percent (5.5 percent in the previous period), mainly boosted by sales of chemicals, machinery and equipment. Imports rose at a slower 3.7 percent (5.3 percent in the previous period).